MLHS
 
MOUNTAIN LAKES HIGH SCHOOL
ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS AND
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
2017 - 2018
 

 
 

INTRODUCTION

 

Mountain Lakes High School promotes a supportive learning environment where every student is challenged, inspired, and empowered to cultivate the intellectual curiosity, skills, and knowledge needed to contribute as a responsible and productive citizen of the global community.  In order for students to gain the most from their high school educational experience, we urge careful course planning that involves the student, his or her parents, teachers, and counselor.  This collaboration will result in a comprehensive educational program that is adapted to individual needs as well as state and local graduation requirements.

 

Mountain Lakes High School’s Program of Studies is a valuable reference manual for students, parents and school personnel actively involved in curriculum planning at Mountain Lakes ; it is a complete guide to course offerings at the high school.

 

Planning an individual student's high school program of studies demands a cooperative effort between home and school. The program of studies that a student pursues in high school should reflect his or her aspirations, achievements and aptitudes. The courses at Mountain Lakes High School provide students with many opportunities to meet educational needs. Beyond State, District, college and career requirements, students are encouraged to select courses that will be academically stimulating and personally enriching. In selecting particular courses, the following criteria should be considered: 

 

Does the course: 

                          Meet the high school graduation requirements?

                          Provide an outlet for interests in specific subject areas?

                          Fulfill college entrance requirements?

                          Reflect the proficiency level for which the student is best suited?

                          Provide a background for post high school plans leading to career options?

       

Students are encouraged to take the strongest possible academic program available within his/her own personal limitations during all four years of high school.  The philosophies of education, specific course requirements, and other qualifications for acceptance vary among the nation's colleges and universities. All, however, recognize the desirability of a broad education with a strong foundation in the traditional, solid academic subjects. A rigorous secondary school preparation remains the best means by which a student can be assured of maximizing the benefits to be derived from a challenging college education.

 

As always, all members of the Mountain Lakes High School staff look forward to assisting you in the exciting process.  

 

Sincerely,

 

Jeremy Davies

Principal

 

School and Counseling Staff                                                                                    Administration

______________, Director of Counseling                                                                   Robert Downes, Assistant Principal

Lorie Lewandowski, School Counselor                                                                        Kurt Hanisch, Supervisor (Science, Prac. Arts)

Randi Green, College and Career Counselor                                                              Paul Henry, Supervisor (English, Fine Arts)

Maria Grasso, School Counselor                                                                                 Frank Sanchez, Supervisor (Social Studies,

Betsy Sullivan, School Counselor                                                                                World Language)                          

David Wolfelsperger

Yvonne Krasner-Cohen, SAC                                                              

Linda Stalter– Administrative Assistant

Trina Simone – Administrative Assistant

 

NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY

 

It is the policy of the Mountain Lakes School District to guarantee equal education opportunity to each child in the public schools.  Equal education opportunity refers to all activities and programs conducted or sponsored by the school day or after regular school hours.

 

The district guarantees to all persons equal access to all facilities and all categories of employment in the district regardless of race, creed, religion, sex, ancestry, age, national origin or social or economic status.

 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS

&

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

 

 

Students must earn a minimum of 122.5 credits in order to graduate.  Students must also take a minimum equivalent of five full year courses plus Physical Education and Health or Driver Education each year (Independent Study cannot be used toward the fulfillment of this minimum). The following minimum credits must be completed by the end of the senior year:

 

 20       Credits of English - 5 credits each year

   5       Credits of World History

 10       Credits of United States History

2.5       Economics (Financial Literacy)

 15       Credits of Mathematics

 18       Credits of Science

   5       Credits of World Language

   5       Credits of 21st Century Skills  (Family Consumer Sciences, Drafting & Design, Computer Science)

   5       Credits Fine/Performing Arts (Art, Band, Chorus, Guitar)

            Physical Education each year of enrollment

            Driver Education, Health and Safety

            Satisfactory completion of NJ Testing Requirement

           

 

CLASS MEMBERSHIP

 

To be a freshman, a student must have successfully completed eighth grade. To be a sophomore, a student must have completed 25% of requirements. To be a junior, a student must have completed 50% of requirements. To be a senior a student must carry a program of studies, which, if passed, will meet diploma requirements.

 

Students must pass state grade requirements each year.

 

New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association

Athletic Eligibility Requirements

 

Number of Credits Required for Participation

2017/2018                      First Semester                                   Second Semester

Grade 9                          0                                                                   15.00

Grade 10                        30.0                                                              15.00

Grade 11                        30.0                                                              15.00

Grade 12                        30.0                                                              15.00

 

EARNING COLLEGE CREDIT

 

High school students may earn college credit while attending high school. Several local colleges encourage this type of program. The County College of Morris offers the Challenger Program which allows presently enrolled qualified high school students, with the endorsement of their school counselor and parents, to enroll in one or two courses per semester during the day or evening. They may take any course offered by the college providing they meet all prerequisites.

           

 

COLLEGE ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS

 

A college entrance (academic) unit is the equivalent of five credits (six credits in the case of Lab Science) in a single academic subject.  Courses with such designation are English, Social Studies, Mathematics, Science, and World Language.  A semester course of 2.5 credits equals one half college entrance units. Acceptable units are determined by the college in question. The minimum for college admissions is usually 16 units. Normally a student earns a minimum of four college entrance units each year.  The senior year program of courses should be consistent with the prior level of achievement. 

           

 

HONOR AND MERIT ROLLS

 

A student must attain a grade point average of 3.5 or higher to be on the honor roll. A grade point average of 3.0 to 3.49 will place a student on the merit roll.

 

 

All courses except physical education are used to compute grade point average.

A grade of “D” or “F” or Incomplete in any course automatically excludes a student from consideration for both the honor and merit rolls.

 

 

Formula:

(G.P.E.) Grade Points Earned =  G. P. A.

(C.A.) Credits Attempted

 

Grade Points Earned = Grade x C.A.

Grades – SEE WEIGHTED SCALE NEXT PAGE

Course Credits - See Course Description.

Marking period credits are used for honor/merit rolls.

Example-English 9  = 1 credit per marking period.

 

Formula for calculating grades 9-12 (follow above criteria using the weighting scale below).

 

Weighting Scale

 

                   CP              H                AP

A+               4.3              4.8              5.3

A                 4.0              4.5              5.0

A-                3.7              4.2              4.7

B+               3.3              3.8              4.3

B                 3.0              3.5              4.0

B-                2.7              3.2              3.7

C+               2.3              2.8              3.3

C                2.0              2.5              3.0

C-               1.7              2.2              2.7

D+               1.3              1.3              1.3

D                1.0              1.0              1.0

D-               0.7              0.7              0.7

F                 0.0              0.0              0.0

 

 

 

CUMULATIVE G.P.A.

 

 

Calculated yearly.

 

(G.P.E.) Grade Points Earned

____________________________= G.P.A.

(C.A.) Credits Attempted

 

The grades used to calculate G.P.A. in a specific course is the average of each marking period plus the mid term and final exam.

 

 

SUMMER CLASSES & G.P.A.

 

Approval must be obtained from the department Supervisor of Instruction, the Director of School Counseling and the Principal prior to enrollment in any summer courses.  Students attend summer courses for a variety of reasons:

 

     If a summer course is taken because a student has failed a course, the course is required to meet for 60 actual class hours (for a full year or 5 credit course) because this course is for remediation.  If successfully completed, credit and the grade for this course will be added to the student’s transcript and calculated in the cumulative G.P.A.  The failed course will likewise remain on the transcript and therefore will be calculated into the cumulative GPA.

 

     If a summer course is taken for advanced placement or enrichment, the course is required to meet for 120 actual class hours for a full year or 5 credit course (60 hours for a semester or 2 ½ credit course).  With the exception of students who have taken an advanced credit course at the MLHS Summer Academy the actual grade earned in a summer program will not be calculated into the MLHS cumulative G.P.A. Courses not taken through the MLHS Summer Academy will still appear on the student’s transcript; however, the grade posted will be a “P” for pass. In all cases, credits earned will be included on the MLHS transcript.

     If a summer course is taken in an attempt to improve a grade in a course already completed, the course is required to meet for 120 actual class hours for a full year or 5 credit course (60 hours for a semester or 2 ½ credit course). The actual grade earned will not be calculated into the MLHS cumulative G.P.A. nor will it be averaged into the grades achieved in the original course taken at MLHS.  Credits earned will also not be posted since credit for the course has already been awarded.

 

Please note that all courses taken under the above circumstances must have curricula approved by the NJ Department of Education.  College courses taken during a high school career will not be included on the MLHS transcript. Students and parents are highly encouraged to coordinate with their assigned counselors prior to enrollment in summer courses in order to avoid any confusion or misunderstandings.

 

 

ONLINE COURSEWORK

Students may earn credit for online coursework from approved institutions that offer secondary accredited programs.  Online coursework may be taken during the summer in accordance with the parameters in place for summer coursework as delineated in the Mountain Lakes High School Curriculum Handbook.  Online courses may not be taken during the school year for courses that are offered within the curricula of Mountain Lakes High School.  Pre-approval from the department Supervisor of Instruction, Director of School Counseling and the Principal is required.  The grade posted on the MLHS transcript for online coursework will be a “P” for pass.

 

 

MOUNTAIN LAKES HIGH SCHOOL ONLINE ACADEMY

The Mountain Lakes High School Online Academy extends the reach of what our school has to offer by providing students an opportunity to explore subjects of interest to them using free online learning materials such as massive open online courses (MOOCs). Whether studying subjects beyond a high school level, exploring potential topics for future careers, or digging deeper into an area of personal interest, the Online Academy gives students the chance to have a direct influence over what they learn, and how they learn it.  Each student who is enrolled in the Online Academy will work one-on-one with the MLHS Educational Technology Specialist to develop a Personalized Learning Plan, which meets his or her individual interests and needs. The plan may utilize a single resource, such as an online course, or pool a variety of online resources to form a comprehensive portfolio of coursework. Once the Personalized Learning Plan is in place, students will pursue their studies over the course of a semester, according to a schedule that works best for them.  Successful completion will be acknowledged on the MLHS high school transcript and by the issuance of a digital badge reflecting the student's achievement.

 

Enrollment in the Online Academy is open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors.  For more information, see:  http://blogs.mtlakes.org/onlineacademy/

  

 

PROGRAM OF INDEPENDENT STUDY

 

Full Year or Half Year - 5 Credits, 2.5 Credits
Grades 10 - 12

Students may apply for the opportunity to do independent work in school, using teachers as consultants. Approval of students for independent study will be based on several factors:

 

1. Purpose                  

2. Intellectual Ability              

3. Aptitude for Inquiry 

4. Imagination

5.  Curiosity

6.  Viability of Proposal

7.  Interest

 

Previous academic accomplishments, supervisor recommendation, and personal interviews will be considered strongly in determining a student’s acceptance into the program. Students will work with a teacher who will direct the student’s research and assess his/her achievement. Independent Study may include a course offered by an approved institution of higher education. Academic credits are earned for all Independent Study on a pass/fail basis. Application must be completed prior to the beginning of a course term.


ACADEMIC PROGRAM AND REQUIREMENTS

                                              

Parents and students should consider the student’s aptitude, ability, interests and scholastic achievement in planning a balanced high school program, which will prepare the student for college as well as for a future profession.

                                                  

Every student will take a minimum of five full-year courses (or the equivalent) each year plus physical education, health or safety.  Typical programs are listed below.

 

Grade 9

English – English 9

Social Studies – World Cultures or History

Math Algebra 1, Geometry Honors, Geometry

Science – Contemporary Biology, Biology or Honors Biology

World Languages – Spanish I or 2, French I or 2, American Sign Language (ASL) 1, Latin I

Physical Education and Human Development

Elective(s) – a minimum of one elective from the performing and fine arts offerings or one from practical arts offerings.

                                                            

Grade 10

English – English 10 or Honors English 10

Social Studies – US History I, Honors US History I, Electives: AP World History, Economics

Math – Geometry, Algebra 2 Honors, Algebra 2

Science – Biology, Chemistry, or Honors Chemistry

World Languages – Spanish, ASL, French or Latin

Physical Education and Driver Education

Elective(s) – recommended

                                             

Grade 11

English – English 11, Honors English 11 or AP English Language

Social Studies – US History II, Honors US History II, AP US History II; Electives: AP World History, AP Government, AP European History, AP Art History, or AP Economics

Math – Algebra 2, Pre-Calculus, Honors Pre-Calculus, Pre-College Math or CP Algebra II Core

Science – Chemistry, Physics & Concepts, Physics, AP Physics 1, Earth/Space Science, Environmental and Sustainability Science, or AP Biology. AP Chemistry, Anatomy & Physiology, AP Environmental Science

World Languages ASL, Spanish, French or Latin (CP or Honors)

Physical Education and Current Health Issues

Elective(s) – recommended

                                               

Grade 12

English – English 12, Honors English 12 or Advanced Placement Literature

Social Studies – Online Economics or AP Economics : AP World History, AP Government, AP European History or AP Art History

Math – Pre-Calculus, Pre College, Discrete Math with Financial Literacy, Calculus,

AP Calculus, Honors Multivariable Calculus or AP Statistics

Science - Physics & Concepts, Physics, Earth/Space Science, Environmental and Sustainability Science, AP Biology, AP Chemistry, or AP Physics 1, AP Physics 2 or AP Physics C, Anatomy & Physiology, AP Environmental Science

World Languages – ASL Spanish, French or Latin (Honors or AP)

Physical Education and Human Relationships

Elective(s) – recommended

 


 

HONORS/AP COURSE APPROVAL

 

The student who desires to take an honors/AP course must demonstrate the motivation and academic credentials necessary for approval and admission into an honors/AP level course of study.

 

COURSE CREDIT

 

Credit in the State of New Jersey is based upon minutes of classroom instruction. 120 hours of classroom instruction equals 5 credits of academic course work.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

Included for each course is the course title, prerequisite, intended grade level (this is a guide rather than a rule), and a brief course description.

 

PLEASE NOTE:  SOME COURSES DESCRIBED IN THIS BOOKLET MAY NOT BE OFFERED DUE TO INSUFFICIENT ENROLLMENT OR OTHER REASONS.

 

IN THE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, (AP) REFERS TO ADVANCED PLACEMENT, (CP) REFERS TO COLLEGE PREPARATORY, (H) REFERS TO HONORS AND (M) REFERS TO MODIFIED.

 

 

CRITERIA FOR CHANGING STUDENT SCHEDULES

 

Student schedules are developed in the spring of each year at which time the faculty and staff engage in much counseling and planning with students.  The process includes input from students, parents, teachers, counselors and administrators.  Finally, the schedule each student selects is produced, and the Board of Education builds its budget from the resulting Program of Studies.

 

Students are expected to honor their commitments and to attend and satisfactorily complete the courses in which they enroll during counseling conferences.

 

After receipt of schedule, changes will not be made for reasons of convenience.  Only educationally sound changes will be considered according to the guidelines listed below:

 

All schedule changes require signatures by: parent, counselor, teacher and supervisor.

 

Schedule changes will be made for the following reasons only:

 

1.              If there is a need to correct a clerical error in the schedule.

2.              If there is a recommendation from the Child Study Team.

3.              If there is a recommendation from an administrator for disciplinary, attendance or instructional reasons.

4.              If there is a request made by the professional staff though the appropriate Supervisor.

5.              If the student needs remediation.

 

Student-initiated schedule changes will not be considered for any of the following reasons:

 

1.             The course content or standards differ from student expectations or the course is not needed for graduation.

2.             The student has a preference for a given teacher or the student has a last minute preference for some other subject.

3.             The student wishes to take less than the required selected courses.

4.              Rearranging periods for convenience.

 

In exceptional cases, an appeal may be made to the Director of School Counseling.  The Director of School Counseling will confer with the Supervisor and the Principal before anyone initiates a change of schedule.  An appeal can be made solely to the Principal only after all procedures have been followed.  Schedule changes are handled on a case by case basis.

 

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION CLASSES 

 

Policies and Procedures for Medically Excused Absences, Grades and Option II

 

In order to keep students who have been medically excused from class connected with the goal of life-long wellness and a healthy lifestyle, students must complete assignments when they are excused from participation in physical education classes.

 

Failures and Option II

 

Students who fail physical education for a marking period are not in good standing for the privilege of Option II.

 

 


ART

 

Foundations of Art                                                                                                  

Grade Level: 9-12
5 credits – Full Year

Foundations of Art provides an understanding of an array of skills and techniques. Students are introduced to drawing skills, color theory, and the principles of two- and three-dimensional design.  Areas of investigation include perspective, portraiture, figure drawing, and still life.  A variety of techniques will be explored.  Approaches to design, the use of direct observational drawing technique and composition will be emphasized. As skills develop, students will continue in their exploration of various media and techniques including drawing, printmaking, painting, mixed media, ceramics, and sculpture. Throughout the course, production activities using a wide variety of media will focus on the development of drawing skills, craftsmanship, and self-expression.

 

Advanced Art                                                                                       

Prerequisite:  Foundations of Art
5 credits – Full Year

The skills and studio disciplines that were provided in the Foundations course are explored in greater depth with concentrations in drawing, printmaking, painting, three-dimensional design and ceramics.

 

Art Portfolio Development                                                                    

Prerequisites: 3 semesters of art
Teacher Recommendation
5 credits – Full Year

This course will offer students the opportunity to become immersed in a variety of artistic media and techniques.  Possible areas for in-depth exploration include painting, drawing, printmaking, and three-dimensional design.  Students will strive to develop a comprehensive portfolio for eventual submission to the College Board Advanced Placement Studio Art program, as well as for inclusion in their college application materials.  A summer assignment prior to entry into the course must be completed.

 

AP Studio Art                                                                   

Prerequisite: Presentation of an Art Portfolio
Teacher Recommendation; Portfolio Development
7 credits – Full Year

Advanced Placement Studio Art is an intensive, full-year course designed for the student who has satisfied a prerequisite of two years of previous study in art.   This course addresses advanced concepts in drawing, color theory, painting, computer-generated design, printmaking, mixed media, or two- and three-dimensional design.  As prescribed by the College Board, the course will result in the development of a portfolio by each student. All students enrolled in AP Studio Art are expected to prepare a portfolio suitable for submission to the College Board.  Prior to entry into the course, each student must present a portfolio of work to the department.  Students must also work over the summer in preparation for the course.

 

COMPUTER EDUCATION

 

 

Multimedia Productions                                                      

Grade Level: 9-12  -  2 1/2 Credits – 1/2 Year

Multimedia is the art form of the digital age. Multimedia melds electronic source material—graphics, audio, video, text, and more—into coherent communications for presentations, movies, websites, games, video or other media. Since multimedia is also at the core of all presentational communication, our students must be media literate. They must have the ability to sift through and analyze the messages that inform, entertain and persuade us every day. This class challenges students to bring critical thinking skills to bear on all media and to question what lies behind media productions and to be aware of factors that influence content.

 

Multimedia Productions (continued)

As students will likely need to create multimedia products as part of their academic and professional experiences students will develop dynamic productions using programs such as PowerPoint, Keynote, Flash, Garage Band, Audacity, iTunes, and iMovie and then publish their projects to the Web on sites such as YouTube.

 

Web Design and Publishing                                                

Grade level: 9-12  - 2-1/2 Credits – 1/2 Year

What would our lives be without the Internet? It is our primary tool for communications and research and it grows both in utility and sophistication every day. In this class, students meet this challenge by developing sites that demonstrate effective user-interface design through functional site organization, convenient navigation, and visually compelling graphics. While working within the framework of the entire web site development process students establish goals, create content, program and script, and design the information architecture in order publish an electronic product. As students develop technical competence and knowledge in a real-life, practical environment, their creative, problem solving, and decision-making skills are enhanced.  In addition to these elements, the class also examines communication, ethical issues, principles of design, and project organization and management.

 

As the Internet has evolved, many new means of communication have emerged. "Web 2.0" is commonly associated with web applications that facilitate interactive information sharing and collaboration. Some popular examples include social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace, Wikis, Blogs, and Twitter. A Web 2.0 site allows its users to interact with other users or to change website content, in contrast to non-interactive websites where users are limited to the passive viewing of information that is provided to them. Students will explore the multitude of Web 2.0 tools and applications to discover personal benefits and to examine how individuals, organizations, and societies can use emerging innovations and technologies to improve communications and to increase productivity to maintain competitiveness in the global marketplace.

 

 

Graphic Design                                                                    

Grade Level: 9-12  - 2 1/2 Credits – 1/2 year

We live in a visual society. Computer generated images have become a new art form and a powerful means of visual communication. This course will enable students to create and manipulate images using Photoshop Elements, a graphic editing program, to compose digital arrangements.  Students will explore drawing and painting capabilities, learn to scan and thus bring non-computer generated images (photographs, drawings, sketches, actual objects) onto the computer drawing board where they can be further manipulated and refined.  In addition, they will use a digital camera and learn how to maximize its unique advantages to produce high quality images to incorporate within their artwork.

 

Graphic design is more than just combining text and graphics; it is the application of art and communication skills to the needs of the client. It takes skill and knowledge from several disciplines to make a printed piece outstanding. Designers must concern themselves with message and aesthetics in order to realize the purpose of the piece. Students will create professional documents and explore various graphic design applications: logos, posters, CD covers, Tee shirt art, and web design with the creation of a digital portfolio showcasing their work.

 

Students will collaborate sharing ideas and experiences with classmates via First Class and with emerging Web 2.0 technologies such as social networking sites, wikis and blogs.  They will apply information literacy skills to access, manage, and communicate information. They will be challenged to think critically and creatively to solve problems and make informed decisions surrounding issues that affect individuals, the world community, and the environment. Through participation in this course, students will gain enhanced understanding of global interdependencies, of diverse cultural perspectives, points of view, and values.

 

 

 

ENGLISH

The courses offered by the English Department fall into two categories: core content courses and electives. The core courses are divided into college preparatory levels and honors levels for each grade, with Advanced Placement offerings in the 11th and 12th grades.  The honors and AP courses require greater self-motivation and independence on the part of the student.  They are the most rigorous and demand that students read at a faster pace and write on a sophisticated level. Students in the 9th grade World Cultures program who seek entrance into the 10th grade honors program must establish and achieve goals, in consultation with their teachers, that reflect their motivation and ability to meet the challenges posed by an honors-level course.  In the 10th and 11th grades, students must secure a teacher recommendation.  A teacher’s recommendation places a student in a class of the appropriate level according to the student’s past performance, initiative, and ability.  Engaging in research utilizing the Modern Language Association format is required at every level.  Summer reading is a requirement for all students.  Elective courses are selected by the students according to their interests.


ENGLISH 9th GRADE

 

World Cultures:  Literature & Composition                                                        

5 Credits – Full Year

The English component of the interdisciplinary World Cultures program emphasizes global awareness and critical thinking skills through the close reading of literature.  In addition, students are introduced at this level to literary genres, Shakespeare, and the research process.  The curriculum includes a cross-cultural examination of universal themes, as reflected through both the traditional canon and non-western, contemporary writers.  Students develop techniques of literary analysis through many opportunities provided for writing and engaging in diverse projects.

 

ENGLISH 10th GRADE

 

English 10: British Literature                                                                             

5 Credits - Full Year

The five strands of the Language Arts Core Curriculum Content Standards--reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing--are developed in this course through the study of the literary heritage of Great Britain and its Commonwealth countries. The student’s awareness of how English literature has played a unique role in helping to shape the ideas and institutions of Western culture is enhanced through an examination of representative genres. Writing and other activities are motivated by the literature.

 

 

English 10 Honors: British Literature                                           

Teacher Recommendation Required            

5 Credits - Full Year

English 10 Honors is an accelerated study of the literary heritage of Great Britain and its Commonwealth countries. The reading and writing components are more advanced than in English 10. Students will be required to demonstrate an advanced level of self-motivation and assume responsibility for their learning.

 

 

ENGLISH 11TH GRADE

 

English 11: American Literature            

5 Credits - Full Year

The five strands of the Language Arts Core Curriculum Content Standards--reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing--are developed through the study of American literature and culture. Through a variety of activities and through a thematic approach to the literature, students will gain a better understanding of the major ideas and values of American society.

 

 

English 11 Honors: American Studies                

Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation OR B+ minimum

in English 10 CP and Quality Writing Assessment

5 Credits - Full Year

American Studies is designed with the idea of connecting literature to the history and political, social, and economic climate of a particular time period.  The course traces the development of American culture and defines the American character from the Puritan through the modern periods in terms of literature, art, music, architecture, philosophy, and technology.  This approach enables students to understand the context for the development of American ideas in addition to facilitating their expertise in the strands of the Language Arts: reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing.

 

English 11:  Advanced Placement Language and Composition                     

Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation OR B+ minimum in English 10

Honors / A- minimum in English 10 CP and Qualifying Exam

5 Credits – Full Year

The Advanced Placement Language and Composition course emphasizes skilled reading of prose, rather than poetry.  Students will be instructed in the reading, interpretation, and analysis of a wide variety of complex prose texts written in a range of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts.  The development of effective expository, analytical, and argumentative writing styles and approaches is one of the primary objectives of this course.  Teacher recommendation is required for admission.  The course is open to juniors and seniors only. Students are expected to register for and to take the College Board AP Language and Composition Exam at the end of the year.

 

ENGLISH 12th GRADE

 

 

English 12:  World Literature                                                                               

5 Credits - Full Year

English 12 is a study of major works that have shaped Western thought.  Students will gain a deeper understanding of Western heritage through an examination of a broad spectrum of world literature.  This literature is the basis from which students will develop and sharpen their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing skills.  Emphasis is placed on developing close reading strategies and analyzing literature through coherent, cogent writing.

 

English 12 Honors:  Humanities                                    

Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation OR
B+ minimum in English 11 CP and Qualifying Writing Assessment

5 Credits - Full Year

This course surveys the development of Western culture from the classical period through the modem period. Representative examples of literature, philosophy, architecture, art, music, and drama are examined, thus relating students to their cultural heritage. This synthesis of the arts provides students with many opportunities to construct their own meanings through reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and research.  Students emerge with an understanding of themes and concepts that shape a coherent vision of Western culture.

 
English 12: Advanced Placement Literature and Composition                       
Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation OR B+ minimum in English 11 Honors / A-   
minimum in English 11 CP and Qualifying Exam

5 Credits - Full Year

The Advanced Placement course in English Literature and Composition involves students in the close reading and critical analysis of literature in preparation for the College Board Advanced Placement examination. By deepening their understanding of literature, students will develop critical standards.  Regular writing assignments will include predominantly analytical pieces.  This course is open to seniors only.  Teacher recommendation is required. Students are expected to register for and to take the College Board AP Literature and Composition Exam at the end of the year.

 

ENGLISH ELECTIVES - Grades 9 - 12

 
Film Studies
2.5 Credits – ½ Year – Grades 10 - 12
Film Study is structured primarily as an introductory course to the elements and techniques of film art. The course is predicated on the assumption that film, while commonly viewed as entertainment, is also a valid and serious art form. Therefore, the course approaches this art form from three critical perspectives: analytical, historical/cultural, and aesthetic. To this end, shots, sequences, and a wide range of films from feature-length narratives to animated, experimental, and documentary shorts will be shown to illustrate the material covered in classroom discussions, the styles present during a particular film period, the establishment of film genres, and the accomplishments of noted artists/auteurs.
 

Digital Journalism                                                                   

2.5 Credits – ½ Year – Grades 9 - 12

Students can enroll for multiple semesters

While honing fundamental writing skills and learning about the essential elements of ethical journalism, students will explore the emergence of various new modes of journalism in the 21st century, the digital age.   Working in a “news room” environment, students will gain experience with computer applications, conduct interviews, engage in research, draft and edit stories, record and video news and features, and post up to date content to enhance the Web edition of The Mountaineer as well as other school and district publications.  In addition, students will have opportunities to explore and practice skills needed to write and produce content for a variety of 21st century communication purposes including public relations, advertising, and civic engagement.  Students will write and produce content for various media including blogs, video, podcasts, and other forms of communication.

 

Public Speaking                                                                                          

2 1/2 Credits—1/2 Year

Public speaking is a class that is designed to nurture the hesitant speaker, as well as further the abilities of students already familiar with the skills needed to speak in front of an audience.  Students will learn how to craft and deliver speeches for a variety of purposes and audiences.  Progress will be charted through self- and peer-evaluations as well as the video taping of speeches.  This course will provide students with practical speaking skills for high school, college, and the workplace.  They will develop a new kind of self-confidence that will grow, as they become more effective speakers.

 

Introduction to Drama: Acting Workshop                                                           

2 1/2 Credits – 1/2 Year

This course will actively involve students in all aspects of acting and the skills required to perform on stage. This course is designed for all students regardless of experience. All students can benefit from the focus skills of this course as they are related to public presence, presentation, audience awareness, and communication.  Students will focus on becoming believable actors and effective communicators of human experience and thought.   Additionally, they will gain knowledge of the cultural and literary heritage of the theatre, as well as a greater appreciation for the range of human experience.

 

English as a Second Language (ESL)                                                                                  

Grade Level 9-12

 2 1/2 or 5 Credits

The English as a Second Language Program provides an opportunity for those students needing assistance in learning the English language. The purpose of the program is to provide students with sufficient fluency in all areas of English to be successfully integrated into the mainstream school program. The program is offered in the high school one period each day for the entire school year. Students enter the program through testing and exit upon becoming English proficient.

 

 

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE

 

Food and Nutrition                                                                                                

Grade Level:  9-12

2 1/2 credits – 1/2 year

This laboratory course is designed to help students acquire food science knowledge and skills including kitchen safety awareness, understanding of food preparation tools and techniques, food handling guidelines, and assessment of nutritional choices.  Students will gain an appreciation for the food spectrum and be able to apply basic principles of the culinary world and of informed consumer decision-making.

 

Advanced Foods                                                                                                   

Grade Level: 9-12

Prerequisite: Food, Nutrition, & Fitness  - 2 1/2 Credits – 1/2 Year 

This laboratory class allows students the opportunity to reinforce skills and knowledge gained in Food and Nutrition.  Students will develop sophisticated culinary skills and advanced baking techniques.  The emphasis will be on preparing whole meals from the seven culinary regions of the United States.  Topics include cultural diversity in foods, food technology, healthy eating, careers in the food industry, and consumer economics.  This course will offer opportunities for problem solving, creativity, and leadership.

 

Foreign Foods                                                                                                       

Grade Level: 9-12

Prerequisite: Food, Nutrition, & Fitness  - 2 1/2 Credits – 1/2 Year

This laboratory class will allow students to build on skills gained from the Food and Nutrition class.  Students will broaden their understanding of the evolution of cuisine from foreign lands.  They will research the factors affecting the variety of food associated with various foreign countries.  Emphasis will be on geography, availability, culture, customs, celebrations, and cooking methods.  This research will allow them to use the basic food preparation techniques and nutrition facts to prepare and serve basic meals and desserts associated with people of diverse cultures.

 

Fashion and Image                                                                                                

Grade Level:  9-12
2 1/2 credits – 1/2 year

Students will develop an understanding of the principles of fashion design and the roles that color, line, design, and texture play in influencing fashion decisions and creating optical illusions.  Students will examine the relationships of society, media, culture, technology and material resources to the history of design.  This course covers basic fashion illustration and descriptions.  Understanding and application of textile profiles will be incorporated into projects. In the laboratory setting, this class will include an introduction to safety, equipment, terms and construction techniques necessary to create several simple projects or a portfolio.  Students will explore the fashion district and will consider career opportunities in the fashion industry.  Fashion from the early 20th century fashion houses to contemporary designers will be studied.

 

 

MATHEMATICS

 

The Mathematics Department at Mountain Lakes High School strives to create an environment where all students can maximize their potential, to address any fears or misconceptions they may have, and to provide them with an experience that will enable them to think critically and become better problem-solvers. Teachers seek to use examples in class that will provide a concrete and conceptual understanding of the material and to engage students by using current technology. All students benefit by having the opportunity to use what they have learned in ways that will impact their world beyond the classroom walls.

 

The department offers a variety of courses that essentially fall into three levels:

·       College Prep Core

·       College Prep Enriched

·       College Prep Honors

 

 Each level is designed to maximize a student’s potential, satisfy personal interest, and provide a foundation to meet future goals. All courses provide an arena where students are be required to think critically, reason logically, and develop a sense about the relation and application of the mathematics to other courses, disciplines, and the real world.

 

College Preparatory Algebra Enriched                                                                     

Grade Level: 9

5 Credits - Full Year

This first year course in elementary algebra develops the basic concepts of algebraic skills through three key ideas: the equation and inequality, data analysis, graphs, and translation of verbal situations into algebraic symbols. Extensive use of the scientific calculator enhances the development. Geometric concepts, probability, and graph interpretation allow for the application of the algebraic skills. Formulas, function notation, graphing, the laws of exponents and radicals, operations with polynomials, factoring, and solving quadratic equations by factoring, writing equations of lines, proportions and the quadratic formula are some of the topics presented.

 

College Preparatory Algebra Core                                      

Grade Level: 9

5 Credits - Full Year

This is the first course in a three-year college preparatory mathematics program, which presents material generally included in Algebra I. This course is designed for the student who has experienced difficulty with mathematics in the seventh and eighth grades.

 

The objectives of the course are twofold: primarily, to improve the basic computational skills of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers, decimals and fractions; secondarily, to introduce the principles of algebra and develop a familiarity with monomial and polynomial manipulations, including factoring, and the solution of first degree equations. 

 

College Preparatory Geometry Honors                                            

Prerequisite: CP Algebra Enriched

Grade Level: 9 or 10

5 Credits - Full Year

This is a course in geometry covering the basic concepts of plane, solid, coordinate, and some analytic geometry stressing deductive proof and reasoning. Throughout the year the properties learned in algebra are re-introduced into this course. The aims and objectives of the course are to develop and show the value of the logic of deductive reasoning and to improve and increase the understanding and application of the terminology, the symbolism, and the structure of mathematics.  The problems explored involve intense analytical thought and require strong algebraic skills.  Non-Euclidean geometries such as fractal geometry and the Lenart sphere are investigated.  Some student projects will involve the use of computer technology.

 

College Preparatory Geometry Enriched                                        

Prerequisite: CP Algebra Enriched

Grade Level: 9 or 10

5 Credits - Full Year

This is a course in geometry covering the basic concepts of plane, solid, coordinate, and some analytic geometry stressing deductive proof and reasoning. Throughout the year the properties learned in algebra are re-introduced into this course. The aims and objectives of the course are to develop and show the value of the logic of deductive reasoning and to improve and increase the understanding and application of the terminology, the symbolism, and the structure of mathematics.

 

 

College Preparatory Geometry Core              

Prerequisite: CP Algebra Core or CP Algebra Enriched

Grade Level: 10

5 Credits - Full Year

This is the second year of a three-year math sequence. Plane geometry as well as coordinate and 3-dimensional geometry are studied. Parallelism, polygons and their properties, similarity, the application of the Pythagorean Theorem, circles, areas, and volumes are the topics of consideration. Throughout the year the algebraic skills are continually applied and reinforced. In all areas a logical verification of the concepts is presented.

 

College Preparatory Algebra II Honors                                           

Prerequisite: CP Geometry Honors

Grade Level 10 or 11                                      

5 Credits - Full Year

This course presents a rigorous and enhanced study of the algebraic concepts introduced in the Algebra I course. These concepts are extensively augmented by the usage of the graphing calculators. The functions - namely the linear, quadratic, absolute value, exponential, and logarithmic - are examined both algebraically and graphically. Because of the emphasis on the graphs of the above-mentioned functions, the graphing calculator is an integral part of this course. Additional topics include the study of the higher-order inequalities, the polynomial and rational functions, the applications of linear and quadratic equations, systems of equations and inequalities, matrix algebra, advanced techniques for graphing functions, and probability.

 

 

College Preparatory Algebra II Enriched                                     

Prerequisite: CP Geometry Enriched
Grade Level: 10-12
5 Credits - Full Year

The second course in algebra enhances the topics begun in the Algebra I course.  The operations with polynomials include advanced factoring skills, working with negative and rational exponents, complex numbers, absolute value, the quadratic formula, graphing lines and parabolas and deriving their equations.  Systems of linear equations, inequalities and applications of linear programming are included.  In depth discussions of the linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions are visited.  Probability, data analysis and statistics are also covered.  Operations and applications using matrices are investigated with the graphing calculator used extensively as a tool.  Synthetic division, arithmetic and geometric sequences round out the course.

 

College Preparatory Algebra II Core       

Prerequisite: CP Geometry Core or CP Geometry Enriched

Grade Level: 11

5 Credits - Full Year

This is the third course of a sequence of a mathematics program. This course provides a general review of the fundamental algebra skills and concepts, and introduces functions and relations. Linear equations and inequalities, quadratic systems of equations, and polynomial and rational expressions are studied in detail. Topics in trigonometry, probability, and statistics are explored. Applications with an algebraic perspective are emphasized. This course would provide qualified students with a third year of college preparatory mathematics.

                                                                                                           

Discrete Mathematics with Financial Literacy
Prerequisites: CP Algebra II Enriched, CP Algebra II Core, CP 

Geometry Enriched

Grade Level: 12

5 Credits - Full Year

The course begins with a review of topics from Trigonometry, followed by a survey of Statistics and Discrete Mathematics, and culminates with a thorough study of Financial Literacy and Economics. All topics lend themselves to a student’s development of problem solving, communication, reasoning, and modeling skills. By modeling real world events, students will view mathematics as a useful tool in human decision-making. Successful completion of the course fulfills the graduation requirements of financial literacy.

 

Pre-Calculus (Honors)                                                                      

Prerequisite: CP Algebra II Honors
Grade Level: 11 or 12
5 Credits - Full Year

This Pre-Calculus Honors course is somewhat similar in content to the Pre-Calculus course, although more emphasis is given to the development of mathematical concepts and is considerably more abstract and rigorous in approach.  In addition, more work is undertaken on the study of vector algebra and the vector equations, parametric equations, and rectangular equations of lines and planes.  Topics in advanced algebra are studied including the binomial theorem, mathematical induction, parametric equations, and polar coordinates. Some emphasis is placed on the study of limits in order to provide sufficient background for the next course in calculus.

 

 

Pre-Calculus                                              

Prerequisite: CP Algebra II Enriched, CP Algebra II Honors
Grade Level: 10-12
5 Credits - Full Year

This course is essentially the study of elementary functions and their graphs.  The graphing calculator is used extensively. Much time is given to the study of analytic geometry, advanced algebra, and trigonometry. A student who successfully completes this course is prepared to study calculus.

 

Pre-College Math                                                                             

Prerequisite: CP Algebra II Enriched
Grade Level: 11-12
5 Credits - Full Year
This course is essentially the study of elementary functions and their graphs.  The graphing calculator is used extensively. Much time is given to the study of analytic geometry, advanced algebra, and trigonometry. This course is recommended for students who have demonstrated difficulty in College Preparatory Algebra II Enriched.  The pace of this course will be determined by the abilities of the class. A student who successfully completes this course is recommended to take Discrete Mathematics. Students who have already taken and passed Pre-calculus cannot enroll in this course as the concepts have already been covered.

 

Calculus                                                                    

Prerequisite: Pre-calculus or Honors Pre-calculus
Grade Level: 12
5 Credits - Full Year

The Calculus course presented at the high school level is intended to serve those students who have successfully competed Pre-Calculus or Pre-Calculus Honors. The purpose of this course is to serve as the first study of differential and integral calculus. Much attention is given to the central ideas of the calculus such as limit the slope of the tangent line, the rate of change, and the area under a curve. At the same time, students will deepen their knowledge and understanding of a function and its utility in representing and answering questions about real-world phenomena. The course differs with AP Calculus significantly in both the depths of similar topics, as well as in the range of the topics considered.

 

In summary, Calculus will enable and provide students with the opportunity to explore the central topics and methods of calculus while developing an awareness of, and appreciation for, the historical origins and the cultural contributions of the calculus.

 

Advanced Placement Statistics                           

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus or CP Algebra II Honors
Co-requisite: Honors Pre-Calculus
Grade Level:  11 or 12
6 Credits – Full Year

The AP Statistics program is built around four essential topics:  exploring data, planning a study, probability as it relates to distributions of data, and inferential reasoning.  Exploratory analysis of data will make use of graphical and numerical techniques in order to study patterns and departures from patterns.  The collection of data will be done according to a well-developed plan in an effort to obtain valid inferences.  Probability is the tool used for anticipating what the distribution of data should look like under a given model.  Finally, statistical inference will guide the selection of appropriate models.  Students who successfully complete this course are expected to take the AP Statistics exam.

 

Advanced Placement Calculus - AB Level                                     

Prerequisite:  Honors Pre-Calculus

Grade Level: 12

6 Credits - Full Year

Advanced Placement Calculus is a college-level course offered to those who successfully complete Honors Pre-calculus and are recommended for further study. The course concerns itself with the material of the calculus of the single variable, as outlined for an AB level curriculum in the College Board’s Acorn booklet. Students who successfully complete this course are expected to take the AP Calculus AB exam. Based on the results of this exam, colleges offer advanced placement and/or credit.

 

Advanced Placement Calculus - BC Level                                     

Prerequisite:  Honors Pre-Calculus
Grade Level:  12
6 Credits - Full Year

Advanced Placement Calculus BC is a college-level course offered to those who successfully complete Honors Pre-calculus and are recommended for further study. The topic outline includes all of the AB topics as well as additional topics required for the AP Exam. The course concerns itself with a rigorous treatment of the calculus of a single variable, as outlined for a BC level curriculum in the College Board’s Acorn booklet. Examples of additional topics include Taylor series, parametric, polar, and vector functions, and the various applications of integrals. Students who successfully complete this course are expected to take the AP Calculus BC exam. Based on the results of this exam, colleges offer advanced placement and/or credit.  Permission of instructor required for admittance into this course.  Students may not waive into this course.

 

 

Honors Multivariable Calculus                                                                                      

Prerequisite:  Calculus

Grade Level: 12

5 Credits - Full Year

Multivariable calculus is a course designed to study the topics from regular calculus extended into three or more dimensions. The class will prove very beneficial for those students interested in advancing their studies in physics, engineering, or applied mathematics at the university level.

 

The course begins with Euclidean geometry in three dimensions.  Topics to be studied include points, lines, and planes, as well as dot and cross product. Functions of two variables will be plotted and analyzed.  Contour plots and level curves in various dimensions will be analyzed as well.  Part of the course will cover differentiation in multiple dimensions, including the analysis of partial derivatives and tangent planes.  Topics such as the chain rule will be extended into n-dimensions. The remainder of the course will also be devoted to the analysis of multiple integrals and how to physically interpret them.  The relation to volume will be studied.  Physical interpretations of these concepts – like center of mass – will be thoroughly developed. A strong relation to physics concepts will be fostered.

 

 

Intro to Computer Programming                                                

Pre-requisite:  CP Geometry Enriched

Co-requisite:  CP Geometry Honors

2 1/2 Credits – 1/2 year

Intro to CP is a foundational computer science course. No previous experience with computer science is required. Students with more experience will have opportunities to extend projects and to expand their knowledge.

 

Intro to CP emphasizes programming more than MLHS's AP CS Principles course. The focus is on getting students comfortable with foundational concepts while introducing students to the power of computer science. Students will spend a significant portion of class time programming collaboratively and individually. The course is presented using a combination of Java and Processing (a language based on Java).

 

Intro to CP topics include:

  • representations of spaces and colors (ex: RGB color)
  • programming tools (ex: the Processing IDE)
  • variables, data types and mathematical operations
  • boolean expressions and conditional statements

Students who take this course can progress to Computer Programming 2 the same year.

 

This course may fulfill the Practical Arts requirement. Students should speak with their Guidance Counselor.

 

 

Computer Programming 2                                                                       

Prerequisite: Intro Comp. Prog.

Grade Level:  9-12

2 1/2 Credits – 1/2 year

Computer Programming II introduces students to Object-oriented programming concepts, teaches them the fundamentals of the Java language and syntax, introduces them to the major class libraries in Java, and prepares them to begin development of applications in Java. Students familiar with object-oriented concepts can learn how to develop Java applications.  This course may fulfill the Practical Arts requirement.  Students should speak with their Guidance Counselor.

 

 

Advanced Placement Computer Science A           

Prerequisites:  B- or above in Intro to Computer

Programming and Computer Programming 2

Grade Level:  10-12

Full Year – 5 Credits

AP Computer Science is an advanced course in computer programming and problem solving. Students will study standard computer algorithms, data structures, computer systems, and file types using the Java programming language. This fast-paced course follows the curriculum set up by the College Board for the AP Computer Science course. The topic outline for this course is as follows:

             1.     Program Design

2.         Program Implementation

3.         Program Analysis

4.         Standard Data Structures

5.         Standard Algorithms

6.         Computer Systems

Although students will be using the Java programming language, programming skills are the focus of this course. All students enrolled in this course are expected to take one of the two levels of the AP Computer Science tests in the spring. Intro to Computers and Computer Programming 2 are prerequisites for Advanced Placement Computer Science. Students who successfully complete this course are expected to take the AP Computer Science exam. 

 

Honors Advanced Data Structures                                                                      

Prerequisites: APCS A  

Grade Level:  11,12

Full Year – 5 Credits

Honors Advanced Data Structures is the continuation of AP Computer Science A. This course covers advanced data structures such as two dimensional arrays, Linked Lists, Sets, Maps, Stacks, Queues, Binary Trees, and hashing. Algorithms to traverse, insert, delete, search and sort using each of these data structures will be analyzed for average efficiency. Students will also work with case studies to gain experience with large programs comprised of several classes.  AP Computer Science A is a prerequisite for Honors Advanced Data Structures.

 

Advanced Placement Computer Science Principles                                         

Prerequisite:  CP Geometry Enriched

Corequisite:  CP Geometry Honors

Grade Level:  10-12

Full Year – 5 Credits

AP Computer Science Principles (CSP) introduces students to the central ideas of computer science.  No previous experience with computer science is required.

 

AP CSP emphasizes programming less than MLHS’s Intro Computer Programming course.  AP CSP focuses on 7 big ideas:  Creativity, Abstraction, Data & Information, Algorithms, Programming The Internet and Global Impact.

 

AP CSP topics include:

  • What happens when you enter a URL in a web browser?
  • How does your phone store your text messages, pictures and videos?
  • How does computing impact your privacy?
  • How can you create apps?

 

Students taking AP CSP are expected to participate in the AP CSP Performance Tasks (during the course) and the AP CSP Exam.

 

AP CSP can be taken in any order relative to MLHS’s other computer science courses.  Students who take AP CSP as a first course can progress to Into to Computer Programming, or with approval, directly into AP Computer Science A.

 

MUSIC

 

Freshman Choir                                                                                                         

Grade Level: 9
5 Credits – Full Year

Freshman Choir is designed as an introductory course to the high school choral program.  It is designed to teach the fundamentals of choral singing in preparation for the advanced choral ensembles.  Emphasis will be placed on vocal technique, such as breath support, tone, intonation, vowel production, diction, musical terms and symbols, sight-reading and musicality.  These elements will be taught through daily vocal exercises and choral repertoire representative of all periods of music, medieval to contemporary.  This choir will perform as a separate choir and will also combine with the larger MLHS Choir in performance.

 

MLHS Choir                                                                                                           

Grade Level: 10-12
5 Credits – Full Year

The purposes of the high school choral program are to offer students experiences in the development of good vocal habits and to provide an overview of a variety of examples of fine choral literature.  Students will refine their vocal skills through exercises and experiences in pitch awareness, breath control, phrasing, balance, blend, posture, interpretation, and performance materials.  Repertoire will be representative of all periods of music, medieval to contemporary.  All Choir members are required to attend rehearsals and concerts.

 

Chamber Choir                                             

Prerequisite: Membership and Enrollment in MLHS Choir;
Teacher recommendation/Audition
5 Credits - Full Year Course

This course is only open to students through audition or by invitation of the instructor.  This course is designed to give serious singers with fine vocal skills, the opportunity to perform musically challenging literature.  The course literature will range from that of the 16th century to the present.  Students are expected to have good to excellent sight singing skills and tonal memory.  Moreover, because the literature is difficult, students are expected to have superior self-motivational skills. Because the ensemble must be a balanced one, each year students will audition for available openings.  Attendance at all scheduled performances is a must.  Moreover, students must be prepared to perform during the high school graduation ceremony and other school events.  The instructor reserves the right to re-audition ensemble members each year.

 

 

Symphonic Band                             

Prerequisite: Must have some experience playing an instrument
Grade level: 10-12
5 Credits - Full Year

The purpose of the Symphonic Band is to provide students with an overview and understanding of band literature from all compositional periods.  The students will continue to improve on the skills and techniques learned in elementary and middle school, as well as the beginning level of the high school band program.  In addition, students will use music as a way to improve self-discipline, teamwork, and appreciation of music and its role in society.  Symphonic Band members are required to play with the Pep Band at all home football games.  All Symphonic Band students are required to attend small group lessons once a week.  Seating is by audition.

 

 

Wind Ensemble                                           

Prerequisite:  Teacher’s recommendation and/or audition

Grade level: 10-12

5 Credits – Full Year

The Wind Ensemble is an advanced ensemble.  The ensemble will provide the appropriate educational setting for students to work on music suited for a higher performance level.  This smaller group will allow students to play more independently and learn literature that is appropriate for a Wind Ensemble’s instrumentation.  Students will continue to develop the skills and techniques learned in previous band classes.  Wind Ensemble members are required to play with the Pep Band at all home football games.  All Wind Ensemble students are required to attend small group lessons once a week.  Seating is by audition.

 

 

Concert Band                                                                                                             

Grade Level: 9
5 Credits--Full Year

This class is offered to students who fall into one of the following categories:  freshman musicians of band instruments, those learning a new instrument, or upperclassmen who are less experienced on a particular instrument.  Class will meet every day and will work through a concept-based program designed to comprehensively teach the fundamentals of music, as well as music to be performed in concert.  The students will work on the skills necessary to excel on their instruments, including scales, rhythms, sight reading, tone quality, dynamics, and balance.  Concert Band Members are required to play with the Pep Band at all home football games.  All Concert Band students are required to attend small group lessons once a week.

 

 

Music Theory I                                                                                                                

Grade level: 9-12

5 Credits—Full Year

The study of music theory is the study of the functional content of musical composition.  This course provides an in-depth examination of the characteristics of sound:  dynamics, rhythm, melody, harmony, and tone color-timbre.  Students will examine basic and advanced issues which concern the following areas:  rules which govern harmonization, voice leading, melodic devices, compositional devices, error detection and how to solve harmonic and voice leading problems in small music forms.  Through analysis, students will be introduced to conventional music compositional forms.  Students are evaluated by means of class work, tests, and projects.

 

AP Music Theory                                                                                                   

Grade level: 10-12
5 Credits—Full Year
Prerequisite:  Music Theory I or Entrance Examination

In AP Music Theory, a great variety of musical activities may be employed in any given class: performing, listening, analyzing, and composing. Particular emphasis is placed on writing music, believing that in composing one faces the most vivid and essential musical questions. In individual ways, we integrate hearing with analysis and analysis with performing. This course provides an in-depth examination of tonal harmony and analysis of the 17th and 18th-centuries, thus giving students an understanding of how music is composed. The course is designed to develop a student’s ability to recognize, understand and describe the basic materials and processes of music that are heard or presented in a score. The achievement of this goal may be best promoted by integrated approaches to the student’s development or aural, sight-singing, written, compositional and analytical skills presented through listening, performance, writing, and analytical exercises. Students are expected to register for and to take the College Board AP Music Exam at the end of the year.

 

 

Guitar                                                                                                                     

Grade level: 9-12

2 1/2 credits—1/2 year

This class is offered to students who have no experience, or are at a novice level, in playing the guitar.  Basic guitar methods (picking, strumming, chords), reading music, and writing music will be instructed.  The class will begin with the basics of reading music notation, while learning the notes on the guitar, and progress to performing melodies and accompaniments.  The class is open to all students; no previous musical experience is necessary.  The number of students in the course will be limited.

 

 

Advanced Guitar                                                                                                  

Grade Level: 9-12

2 1/2 Credits-1/2 Year

Prerequisite: Guitar I and Teacher Approval

Students are encouraged to enroll in Advanced Guitar in more than one semester.  For example, students who have taken Guitar and Advanced Guitar previously, may take Advanced Guitar again for additional credit.

 

This course will expand upon topics introduced in Guitar I.  Note reading will continue to be emphasized, as well as a more comprehensive knowledge of chords and some finger style techniques.  Students in Advanced Guitar may perform as an ensemble in school concerts and outside of school, as well.  Students interested in these performance opportunities should take Advanced Guitar more than once. 

 

 

 

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH & SAFETY

 

Physical Education (All Students)                                         

Grade level: 9-12  - 
3 Credits - Full Year

The program in physical education strives to develop a sense of importance and enjoyment of physical fitness in each student. The course utilizes both individual and team activities. The development of physical fitness, coordination, knowledge of rules, confidence, cooperation and enjoyment of activity are all important aspects of the program. Project Adventure activities are utilized to develop a feeling of mutual trust, group initiative, and problem solving.

 

Health - all health classes develop knowledge,                                                    

decision making, and interpersonal skills.                                                      

Required Course

1 credit - 1/4 year
 

Grade 9                                                                                                           

1 Credit – 1 Marking Period

Human Development - Human growth and reproduction, abstinence, contraception, sexually transmitted disease, acquaintance rape, teen pregnancy and drugs.

 

Grade 11                                                                                                         

1 Credit – 1 Marking Period

Current Health Issues - Disease, lifestyle, drugs and environmental concerns.

 

Grade 12                                                                                                         

1 Credit – 1 Marking Period

Human Relationships - Marriage and family living, contemporary issues in human sexuality, and drugs.

 

Driver Education (Theory)                                                

Grade level: 10 -  1 Credit – 1 Marking Period

This course consists of 30 hours of classroom instruction in the fundamentals of driving. The course stresses safety, courtesy, driving laws, insurance, and awareness of the dangers of drinking and driving and proper driving techniques. The student will take the written test for his/her New Jersey driving permit in class. Upon completion of the course, the student may take 6 hours of behind the wheel instruction with the Easy Method Driving School.

SCIENCE

Honors courses in science are available in the areas of biology, chemistry and physics. They are comprehensive and intensive courses designed for the student who not only has an interest in these areas but who has already demonstrated high achievement in previous science courses, is prepared for an in-depth study, and is motivated to excel at an honors level. In addition, students planning to take Honors Biology must have excellent writing skills, whereas those participating in Honors Chemistry and especially Honors Physics are expected to have demonstrated a high aptitude in math.

The honors courses are rigorous and require high levels of critical thinking, logical reasoning, and concept formation. In addition to learning factual information, students are expected to be well organized so that they can collect and interpret data, formulate conclusions, and apply their results appropriately. Honors courses include laboratory experiments, which require more abstract reasoning, and application of concepts than do the college preparatory science courses and consequently only those students who are prepared to meet these expectations should consider the higher-level courses.

In addition to the honors courses, the Mountain Lakes High School Science Department also offers Advanced Placement courses in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Environmental Science.

Contemporary Biology                                                                           

Grades 9-12
6 Credits - Full Year

Contemporary Biology is intended as an alternative to college preparatory and honors courses. Although this course covers many of the topics traditionally found in a high school biology course, the emphasis is on the practical, using everyday experiences and examples throughout its presentation.

 

This course is intended for the student whose individual needs include strong, consistent reinforcement of knowledge areas as well as basic study skills such as reading, writing, note taking and test taking. This will be accomplished through numerous laboratory experiences, demonstrations, "hands- on” activities; computer assisted learning as well as a major project involving research.

Thus, Contemporary Biology is a course that will provide the individual student with numerous opportunities for success while studying relevant topics such as human anatomy and physiology, plant growth and reproduction, the relationships of living things to their environment and social issues regarding the environment. Motivation is achieved through a high-interest, practical, activity-oriented curriculum.

Biology                                                                                                                                  

Grade level: 9
6 Credits - Full Year

Biology is the study of life on the planet Earth.  This is a standard college preparatory life science course.  Among the concepts covered in the course are the structures and functions of cells, the biochemical basis of life, the characteristics of various organisms, the classification of organisms, genetics (including molecular genetics) and heredity, evolution and ecological relationships.  The unity and diversity of life are emphasized.  Various biological processes such as photosynthesis, respiration, circulation, digestion and nervous response are investigated.  Laboratory investigations include studies of cells using the microscope, the examination of live and preserved organisms, and the analysis of genetic problems.

 

Honors Biology                                             

Prerequisite: Previous Science teacher recommendation
Grade level: 9
6 Credits - Full Year

This comprehensive and intensive course is specifically designed for the 9th grade student who not only has an interest in science, but also has already demonstrated previous high-level achievement in science and in writing. The basic topics are similar to the Biology course; however each area in this rigorous course is treated with more in-depth study along with more advanced laboratory work. In addition to developing laboratory techniques and interpreting data, the writing up of experiments is stressed. Students are scheduled for two extended periods for laboratory work.  It is expected that students who enroll in this course will be proficient readers, well organized, capable of abstract reasoning, highly motivated, and recommended by their 8th grade teachers.

 

AP Biology                                                   

Prerequisite: Honors Biology and Honors Chemistry and
Science teacher recommendation
Grade level: 11, 12-
7 Credits - Full Year

The Advanced Placement Biology course is a rigorous course for those students who have a background, ability and motivation to take a first-year college biology course. The syllabus is outlined in the CEEB Advanced Placement Course Description booklet. In-depth studies and experimentation will prepare students for the Advanced Placement Examination in order for them to qualify for college credit and/or placement. Extensive laboratory sessions are scheduled relating to topics covered in lecture and discussion periods are included. Major areas of study include molecular, cellular, organism, and populational biology.  Students are expected to register for and to take the College Board AP Biology Exam at the end of the year.

 

Contemporary Chemistry                                                                                                

Grades 10-11-12
6 Credits - Full Year

Contemporary Chemistry is presented as an alternative to the approaches used in the college preparatory and honors courses. Information obtained in Contemporary Chemistry is designed for practical applications to life in modern society.

                       

The course is highlighted by using numerous laboratory experiences, class activities and demonstrations rather than the traditional lecture. In addition, the student will be provided with opportunities to strengthen reading, writing, math, organizational and thinking skills using the study of chemistry as a vehicle. Lifelong careers are also suggested throughout the course.

Thus, Contemporary Chemistry is a course that “touches all bases” to provide the student with an alternative to traditional chemistry. Motivation is achieved through a high interest, practical, activity-centered approach combined with an effort to improve basic skills.

Chemistry                                                                                    

Prerequisite: CP Algebra Enriched

Grade level: 10-12

6 Credits - Full Year

This Chemistry course serves as a comprehensive college preparatory course.  The basic principles of conceptual and experimental Chemistry are emphasized, and topics of study will include the fundamentals of physical and chemical changes of matter, the theory behind chemical reactions and molecular bonding, and basic formula and equation writing.  Students will develop their critical thinking and problem solving skills by applying abstract chemical concepts to extensive laboratory work.  Students are also taught and encouraged to write cogent and analytical laboratory reports, thereby fostering the growth of their written communication skills.

 

Overall, the course provides students with a solid foundation for future science courses.

Honors Chemistry                              

Prerequisite: Honors Biology, CP Algebra
Co-requisite:  CP Algebra II Enriched
Grade level: 10-12  - 6 Credits - Full Year

This is a comprehensive and intensive course in experimental and conceptual chemistry. The work includes the history and methods of science and ranges over the nature of atoms, molecules, and reactions. Among the major topics are structure, nuclear chemistry, quantum chemistry, bonding, formula and equation writing, stoichiometry, change of state, thermo chemistry, solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, and electrochemistry. Understanding the periodic table, developing laboratory techniques, interpreting data, and writing up experiments are stressed. The extensive laboratory work ranges from investigating the fundamental laws of chemical change to the analytical chemistry of acid-base titration and the determination of reaction rates. Modes on instruction include lecture, laboratory, demonstration, group discussion, and student board work. It is expected that students who enroll in this course will be able readers and proficient in basic algebra.

 

Advanced Placement Chemistry                            

Prerequisites: Honors Biology, Honors Chemistry
Co-requisites: Honors Pre-calculus or Pre-calculus
Grade level: 11-12
7 Credits - Full Year

The AP Chemistry course is essentially a first-year college chemistry course designed to prepare the student for the Advanced Placement Examination. The content includes the items specified in the CEEB Advanced Placement Course Descriptions booklet. Specifically, the course involves review and elaboration of principles encountered in chemistry and physics especially in the area of atomic structure, bonding, equilibrium, and kinetics, thermodynamics and electrochemistry. Students are expected to spend at least six hours a week in textbook study, problem solving and laboratory reports outside of class.  Students are expected to register for and to take the College Board AP Chemistry exam at the end of the year.

 

Physics & Concepts                                                                            

Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry
Co-requisite:  CP Algebra II Enriched
Grade level:  11-12
6 Credits - Full Year

Physics & Concepts is a laboratory-based physics course that is writing intensive.  Standard topics in mechanics, thermodynamics, waves, optics, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics will be covered.  The course will require some use of algebra and geometry but the emphasis will be on written descriptions of the physics of everyday phenomena.

 

Physics                                                                                    

Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry
Co-requisite: Pre-Calculus
Grade Level:  11-12
6 Credits - Full Year

This is a college preparatory course in physics, which is designed to interest and benefit all students. The student explores topics such as space, time, motion, energy, light, waves, sound, electricity and modern physics by means of a variety of activities. Included are laboratory experiments, numerous demonstrations, and computer-aided experiments.

   

AP Physics 1                                                                                                                          

Grades 11-12
Prerequisites:  Honors Biology & Honors Chemistry
Co-requisite:  Honors Pre-calculus or Calculus
7 Credits – Full Year

AP Physics 1: Algebra-based is the equivalent of a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics that is designed to be taught over a full academic year. Having a full year enables AP teachers and students to develop deep understanding of the content and to focus on applying their knowledge through inquiry-based laboratory experiences. The full year also allows time for inclusion of physics content specified by New Jersey State standards. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound. It also introduces electric circuits.  Students are expected to register for and to take the College Board AP Phyaics 1 Exam at the end of the year.

 

 

AP Physics 2                                                                                                                                

Grade 12
Prerequisites:  AP Physics I or Physics - Co-requisite:  Calculus or AP Statistics or AP Chemistry and Calculus
7 Credits – Full Year   

AP Physics 2: Algebra-based is the equivalent of a second-semester college course in algebra-based physics that is designed to be taught over a full academic year. Having a full year enables AP teachers and students to develop deep understanding of the content and to focus on applying their knowledge through inquiry-based laboratory experiences. The full year also allows time for inclusion of physics content specified by New Jersey State standards. The course covers fluid mechanics; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; optics; atomic and nuclear physics.  Students are expected to register for and to take the College Board AP Physics 2 Exam at the end of the year.

 

AP Physics C                                                                                                                                

Grade 12
Prerequisites:  AP Physics 1 - Co-requisite:  AP Calculus AB or BC
7 Credits – Full Year

There are two AP Physics C courses — Physics C: Mechanics and Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism, each corresponding to approximately a semester of college work.  Mechanics is typically taught first, followed by Electricity and Magnetism.  The courses are taught over the course of a year, with approximately equal time given to each.  Both courses will utilize guided inquiry and student-centered learning to foster the development of critical thinking skills and will use introductory differential and integral calculus throughout the course.

Physics C: Mechanics will provide instruction in each of the following six content areas: kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation.  Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism will provide instruction in each of the following five content areas: electrostatics; conductors, capacitors and dielectrics; electric circuits; magnetic fields; and electromagnetism

Permission of instructor is required for admittance into this course.  In addition, Prospective students must have taken the AP Physics 1 National Examination administered by the College Board and received a score of 3, 4 or 5.  Students may not submit a Course Placement Application to gain entrance into these courses.

 

Earth/Space Science                                 

Prereqs: Any Biology Course & Any Chemistry Course
Grade Level 11-12
6 Credits - Full Year

Earth/Space Science is the study of the materials, which compose the planet Earth, the processes that alter those materials, and the features and processes found in the universe outside our world.  The course is divided into four main sections: geology, astronomy, meteorology, and oceanography.  The physics topics of motion, forces and energy will be infused, where applicable, throughout the course.  Geologic studies include the study of the structure of the Earth, minerals and rocks, volcanic activity, the measurement of geologic time, erosion, shoreline features, earthquakes, mountain formation, plate tectonics, and ancient life. Astronomy considers the nature and formation of the solar system, stars, and galaxies. Meteorology deals with the composition, structure, and behavior of the atmosphere. Various weather phenomena are considered and worldwide weather patterns are studied. Oceanographic studies include investigations of the structure, chemistry, and behavior of the world’s oceans. Ocean currents and the sea floor are studied. Laboratory work includes the use of minerals, rocks, fossils, several kinds of maps, stereoscopic aerial photographs of the Earth’s surface, earthquake records, weather satellite images and maps, star charts, and a telescope for viewing extra-terrestrial features.

 

Environmental & Sustainability Science  -   

Prereqs: Any Biology Course & Any Chemistry Course
Grade Level 11-126 Credits - Full Year

Environmental & Sustainability Science is intended to bring the outside world into the classroom in a way that engages, involves, and empowers the students – no matter what their ability levels. Environmental & Sustainability Science uses real case studies, current data, engaging inquiry activities, and rich multimedia support in order to drive home each concept. The aim of the class is to make Environmental & Sustainability Science personal, actionable, and inspiring. Students will gain an understanding of Environmental Science, current economics and environmental policy, Earth’s environmental systems, ecology, humans and the environment, and how we can use Sustainability Science to ensure a livable, productive planet Earth now and for future generations.

 

Human Anatomy & Physiology                                                  

Prerequisites:  Biology and Chemistry
Grades:  11 and 12
6 Credits – Full Year

Human Anatomy and Physiology is a college preparatory course designed for the junior or senior student with a genuine interest in the biological sciences, or a strong interest in a possible career choice for which a background in Anatomy and Physiology might be of value.  The course will be targeted at the general level student at Mountain Lakes, so that, with appropriate effort, most of our students could successfully complete the course.

 

Human Anatomy and Physiology will be a survey of human systems, their functions, and mechanisms of action.  Emphasis will be placed on integration of systems, homeostatic mechanisms, and failures of those mechanisms that lead to disease.  Laboratory activities will be an integral part of the course, and will include dissections, mechanical, and chemical activities, as well as cardiovascular and pulmonary activities related to exercise and fitness.  Topics covered will include a review of cell biology, the integument, muscle anatomy and physiology, the nervous system, the senses, the cardiovascular system, the excretory system, hormonal control physiology, the reproductive systems, and human development.  (NOTE:  Students who may have struggled in Biology and/or Chemistry will have difficulty in this course.)

                                

AP Environmental Science                           

Prerequisites:  Honors Biology & Honors Chemistry 
Prerequisite:  Algebra II
Grade 11 & 12 
7 Credits – Full Year

The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study. Yet there are several major unifying constructs, or themes, that cut across the many topics included in the study of environmental science. The following themes provide a foundation for the structure of the AP Environmental Science course.

                                                       

1.     Science is a process.

          -   Science is a method of learning more about the world.

-        Science constantly changes the way we understand the world.

 

2.     Energy conversions underlie all ecological processes.

          -   Energy cannot be created; it must come from somewhere.

-        As energy flows through systems, at each step more of it becomes unusable.

 

3.     The Earth itself is one interconnected system.

          -   Natural systems change over time and space.

-        Biogeochemical systems vary in ability to recover from disturbances.

 

4.     Humans alter natural systems.

          -   Humans have had an impact on the environment for millions of years.

-        Technology and population growth have enabled humans to increase both the rate and scale of

    their impact on the environment.

 

5.     Environmental problems have a cultural and social context.

-        Understanding the role of cultural, social, and economic factors is vital to the development of

   solutions.

 

6.     Human survival depends on developing practices that will achieve sustainable systems.

          -   A suitable combination of conservation and development is required.

-         Management of common resources is essential.

 

The AP Environmental Science course is an excellent option for any interested student who has completed two years of high school honors laboratory science — one year of honors life science and one year of honors chemistry. Due to the quantitative analysis that is required in the course, students should also have completed an Algebra II course (Enriched or Honors).  The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of a one semester, introductory college course in environmental science. Students are expected to register for and to take the College Board AP Environmental Science Exam at the end of the year.

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

 

The Mountain Lakes High School Social Studies Department realizes that in the 21st century, our students need to be prepared to live as global citizens. Therefore our classes are geared to help students acquire knowledge of the diverse people with whom they share this world. Moreover, as the world is experiencing a virtual revolution in information and communication technologies, MLHS students need to be trained to acquire and critically evaluate the abundance of information. Our teachers use resources and primary sources that foster the skills students need to communicate their knowledge about the social sciences

 

Honors courses in history often use the same basal texts that are used in the regular academic programs, but the teacher supplements heavily with outside-of-class readings and with additional paperback volumes not required in the regular program. For Advanced Placement Courses, students are given college-level textbooks and readings. The honors and AP student should anticipate fifteen to twenty pages of reading per night, and often this material is analytical and complex. Research assignments frequently add to this reading obligation.

 

Honors courses place a considerable emphasis on narrative and analytical writing. In-class essays and research papers are assigned frequently. High standards of written composition are maintained, and many students find the writing obligation of the honors history program to be the most challenging dimension of the course. Advanced Placement courses assign writing tasks, such as DBQ essays and Free-Response assignments that are modeled after the AP exams.

 

In addition to the honors courses, the Mountain Lakes High School Social Studies Department also offers Advanced Placement courses in United States Politics, Comparative Government, Macroeconomics, Microeconomics, Art History, United States History, World History and European History.

 

GRADE 9

 

 

World Cultures                                                                                                                         

Required
Grade Level: 9
Credits - Full Year

World Cultures examines the geography, history, culture and literature of the non-western, contemporary world. An interdisciplinary approach to the Social Studies and English curricula, this course emphasizes global awareness and the development of critical thinking skills. The interdependence of nations and human communities will be examined. Students will interpret literature, analyze data, research solutions to global problems and present their ideas in writing, as well as in formal speech and debate.   The course includes both current issues and historical content to provide a comprehensive understanding of the present state of the developing, post-colonial world and how it became what it is today.  The course culminates with the Model UN project, an extensive synthesis assessment that measures the student's application of the material covered throughout the year.

 

GRADE 10

 

 

United States History I Honors                                                                                    

Grade level: 10
5 Credits - Full Year

This is a survey course in American history from colonial times to the closing of the American frontier after the Civil War. Skill development emphasis is placed on reading, composition and discussion. Extensive use is made of primary sources and audio-visual materials. Project and presentation opportunities are numerous and varied. A wide selection of evaluative techniques is employed. Only students who complete the World Cultures Portfolio will be matriculated in this course.

 

United States History I                                                                                                                  

Grade Level 10
5 Credits - Full Year

This is a survey course in American history from colonial times to the closing of the American frontier after the Civil War. Although the emphasis is primarily historical, some attention is given to the cultural trends in American society. A wide range of evaluative techniques are used.

 

GRADE 11

US History II                                                                                                                   

Grade level: 11
5 Credits - Full Year

A sequel to United States History I, this course surveys American history from the turn of the 20th century to the present. The major theme of the course is the economic and global reach of the United States from the late Gilded Age to our current Information Age. Students will be encouraged to do in-depth work in one of the major study areas. Periodicals and audiovisual aids will be used extensively.

 

US History II Honors                                                                                                      

Grade level: 11
5 Credits - Full Year

A sequel to United States History I, this course surveys American history from the turn of the 20th century to the present. The major theme of the course is the economic and global reach of the United States from the late Gilded Age to our current Information Age. Students will be encouraged to do in-depth work in one of the major study areas. Periodicals and audiovisual aids will be used extensively. As an honors course, students will be challenged with greater reading assignments and frequent writing tasks that further develop critical thinking skills.

 

Advanced Placement U.S. History II                                                                             

Grade level: 11
5 Credits - Full Year

This rigorous survey of American history leads to both the fulfillment of the state’s American history requirement and success in the American History A.P. Test. There is a heavy emphasis on both reading and writing about American history. Original source materials and scholarly interpretations are read and discussed on a daily basis. Oral participation in classroom discussion is expected of all students, and considerable effort must be devoted to the development of research and analytical papers outside of class. This program is intended for students who possess very good communication and thinking skills, and who are well motivated toward the study of American history.  Students are expected to register for and to take the College Board AP U.S. History II Exam at the end of the year.

 

GRADE 12

 

Economics Seminar                                                                                            

Grade Level: 10-12
2 1/2 Credits - 1/2 Year

This one-semester, online course also meets the Economics requirement. Focusing on mostly financial literacy topics, the course will help teens master the foundational elements of personal finance and to prepare for life on their own. Topics include; savings accounts, checking accounts, credit cards, taxes, loans and interest, home loans, auto loans, insurance, bonds, stocks, mutual funds, risk and diversification and inflation. Although students will take the course online, the Social Studies Supervisor, Mr. Sánchez, will manage it.

 

AP Economics                                                                                               

Prerequisite:  AP US History 2                                                                        
Co-requisite:  Must be enrolled in Calculus, AP Calculus AB,

AP Calculus BC, AP Statistics or Honors Multivariable

5 Credits - Full Year

This full-year course offers two separate programs of study in economics: one in AP Microeconomics and AP Macroeconomics The purpose of the AP course in microeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. The purpose of the AP course in macroeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. Upon completion of this full-year course, students are recommended to take one or both AP exams in May. A separate score is reported for each.  Students are expected to register for and to take the College Board AP Macro and Microeconomics Exams at the end of the year.

 

Economics 101                                                                                                  

Grade Level: 12

2½ Credits – ½ Year

This is a one-semester introduction to the field of Economics. Such basics as economic vocabulary, consumer economics, personal budgets and savings, factors of production, supply and demand, money and monetary policy, and an introduction to the stock market will be studied..

Key concepts will be taught through videos, current articles, readings from the text, and individual and group projects.

 

This course must be recommended by the Child Study Team.

 

SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES

 

Advanced Placement World History                                                                       

Grade level: 10-12
5 Credits – Full Year

This college freshman level course offers motivated students the opportunity to immerse themselves in global history with a balanced curriculum that covers Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and Oceania. Building on content and skills from Freshmen World Cultures, students will develop an even greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts in different types of human societies. Depending on the college or university, students may earn college credits by passing the Advanced Placement Examination prepared by the College Board. Rising sophomores who matriculate for this course must complete the World Cultures portfolio.  Students are expected to register for and to take the College Board AP World History Exam at the end of the year.

 

 

Advanced Placement Government                                                                      

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of a Social Studies Honors or AP class 
Grade level: 11-12
5 Credits – Full Year

This full-year course offers two separate programs of study in government: one in American politics and one in a comparative study of global governments. The U.S. Government & Politics portion of the course gives students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. The Comparative Government and Politics portion introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings. The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes, and to communicate to students the importance of global political and economic changes. In addition to covering the major concepts that are used to organize and interpret what we know about political phenomena and relationships, the course covers six countries and their governments: China, Great Britain, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, and Russia. Upon completion of this full-year course, students are recommended to take one or both AP exams in May. A separate score is reported for each.  Students are expected to register for and to take the College Board AP Government Exam at the end of the year.

 

 

Advanced Placement European History                                                        

Prerequisite: Compleition of a Social Studies Honors/AP Course
Grade level: 11 & 12
5 Credits – Full Year

This college freshman level course surveys and interprets the evolution of Western Civilization from the Renaissance to the present, examining political, socio-economic and cultural trends. Special attention is given to the emergence of strong nation-states, revolutions and contemporary problems resulting from global wars. Non-western civilizations are examined in terms of their interaction with the west. Students should be highly motivated and possess superior writing skills. Depending on the college or university, students may earn college credits by passing the Advanced Placement Examination prepared by the College Board.  Students are expected to register for and to take the College Board AP Euro History Exam at the end of the year.

 

 

Advanced Placement Art History                                                                         

Grade Level: 11-12
5 Credits – Full Year

This course is designed to be similar to an introduction college-level course in art history. The major focus of the course shall include both Western and non-Western art. Emphasis shall be placed in the fields of architecture, sculpture, painting, and other art forms within their historical and cultural contexts. Students will earn to look at works of art critically, with intelligence and sensitivity, and to articulate what they see and experience. No prior exposure to art history is required. However, students who have done well in other courses in the humanities, such as history and literature, or in any of the studio arts are especially encouraged to enroll. The course also prepares students for the national Advanced Placement examination that affords students to earn college credits with a passing score.  Students are expected to register for and to take the College Board AP Art History Exam at the end of the year.

 

 

Psychology                                                                                                                          

Grade level: 10-12
2 1/2 Credits - 1/2 Year

This course will examine selected topics dealing with human behavior in order to provide students with an understanding of how such social science disciplines as Sociology, Anthropology and Psychology investigate behavior. The areas to be covered will include the following: perception, thought, language, learning, the factors affecting intelligence, the cycle of life from childhood to old age, the brain, personality and behavior.

 

Honors Psychology Seminar                                                                                            

Grade level: 11-12
2.5 Credits – 1/2 Year

Honors Psychology Seminar is a rigorous course that moves at an accelerated pace. It is a 2.5 credit, semester class that will run in the Spring. It is an Honors level course, bringing with it Honors weighting. The course is designed for students who have demonstrated an interest in psychology; although some students independently register for the AP exam, the scope and sequence of the curriculum will not be completed by the test in May.

 

Students will be successful in this course if they (1) have proven they can work well independently, (2) know how to pace themselves and remain motivated without a teacher directly guiding them day-in, day-out, (3) are adept at navigating material delivered online, and (4) have demonstrated strong writing and communication skills.

 

Honors Seminar: Holocaust & Genocide                                                                      

Grade level: 10-12
2 1/2 Credits - 1/2 Year

This honors-level, semester course presents historical film and literary perspectives on Hitler’s war against the Jews. The societal context of Europe of the 1930s and 1940s will be examined in an attempt to reach conclusions about the causes of the “Final Solution.” Nazi policies, ideology and personalities will be studied, along with resistance attempts by Holocaust victims and the heroic efforts of people who sought to save Jews and other “enemies of the Reich” from persecution. Once the Nazi Holocaust has been studied carefully, students will survey other attempts at genocide in order to more fully understand this frightful phenomenon.


Law & Courts in American Life                                                                                  

Grade level: 10-12
2.5 Credits – ½ Year

The Law and Courts in American Life is a 2.5-credit, blended-learning course running from January 2018 through June 2018. The course covers court issues that stem from the Bill of Rights and current cases before the Supreme Court. Course content is delivered mainly online. The teachers will be available online during advertised “office hours” and also during the school day by appointment for face-to-face conferencing. Mandatory class meetings will be scheduled between teacher and students. In order to pass the course, students must attend these meetings. Additionally, a mandatory pre-meeting for all accepted students will be held in late January. Students are encouraged to collaborate via discussions and/or group study sessions which can be done virtually or in-person. Virtual discussions and group work will be facilitated by our district’s Canvas learning management system (“LMS”) we will be using to manage the course.


SPECIAL SERVICES

 

Learning Strategies                                                                                              

Grade Level:  9-12
Credits based on number of weekly sessions

This course is designed as a four-year course to help students acquire better study and organizational techniques, to review basic academic skills, to learn and practice self advocacy skills, to learn transitional skills, and to provide curriculum support in academic classes.  Students’ Individualized Educational Plans dictate the nature of instruction offered in this course.

 

Academic credits are earned on a pass/fail basis.

 

 

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

 

 

Engineering/Architectural Drafting & Design - Levels 1-4                                     

Grade Level: 9-12

5 Credits - Full Year

This Course is designed to expand the interested student’s knowledge of architecture and engineering concepts.  Students will use the latest architectural and mechanical software available, as well as the most up-to-date computerized numerical control process (C.N.C).  Floor plans, model building, and three-dimensional drawing are all pivotal aspects in the field of architecture, and in turn, students will frequently be presented with the opportunity to practice such skills.  Intriguing real-world problem solving activities are frequented where students are encouraged to utilize their creative problem solving skills to develop a solution to an engineering challenge. When appropriate, guest lecturers and field trips are identified to support and supplement the achievement of course objectives.

 

 

WORLD LANGUAGES

 

The World Language Honors Program seeks to develop language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) that are useful in themselves and can be applied to various activities and disciplines.  Included in the study of French and Spanish at the advanced levels are knowledge of French and Spanish culture, theatre, civilization and the study of unabridged literature.

 

French and Spanish courses will be conducted for the most part in the target language.  Students will be expected to take notes in the target language, ask and answer questions with ease and comprehend lectures in the language.  Students will read, make oral presentations, and write in the language.

 

Seniors will be encouraged to take the Advanced Placement exam in French or Spanish language.

 

 

American Sign Language (ASL)

Our American Sign Language program explores naturally existing language widely used by Deaf people in North America. Since ASL is a visual-gestural language, students will need to develop unique communication skills. These consist of using the hands, body, face, eyes and space. In order to achieve progress in this class, it is important to become comfortable communicating with your whole body and listening with your eyes.

 

 

American Sign Language (ASL) 1*                                                                         

Grade Level: 9-12

5 Credits - Full Year

American Sign Language is a visual language with vocabulary, grammar, idioms, and syntax different from English. This course focuses on the development of conversational sign-language skills and the grammatical structure of American Sign Language. Students are exposed to a variety of sign systems and modes of communication used by the Deaf community. This course introduces the history of sign language and the importance of Deaf culture. Class participation is an integral part of the course.

 

* For application purposes, some colleges may not accept American Sign Language as a world language.  Check the MLHS World Language website for a list of colleges that do accept ASL.

 


American Sign Language (ASL) II*                                                                       

Grade Level: 10-12
5 Credits - Full Year

This is the second course of our three-year ASL program.  Students will add to their study of ASL vocabulary and increase proficiency in expressive and receptive conversational skills using more complex grammatical structures.  Students will continue to learn about Deaf culture, and Deaf history.  ASL has no vocal component; therefore, when students are utilizing the language there will be no voicing allowed.  Class participation is an integral part of the course.

 

* For application purposes, some colleges may not accept American Sign Language as a world language. Check the MLHS World Language website for a list of colleges that do accept ASL.

 

American Sign Language (ASL) III*                                                                     

Grade Level: 11-12

5 Credits - Full Year

This is the culminating course of our two-year ASL program. Students will add to their study of ASL vocabulary and increase proficiency in expressive and receptive conversational skills using more complex grammatical structures.  Students will continue to learn about Deaf culture, and Deaf history.  ASL has no vocal component; therefore, when students are utilizing the language there will be no voicing allowed.  Class participation is an integral part of the course.

 

* For application purposes, some colleges may not accept American Sign Language as a world language. Check the MLHS World Language website for a list of colleges that do accept ASL.

 

Latin

Have you ever wondered who invented indoor plumbing, the calendar, passports or the notion that everyone is innocent until proven guilty?  Step onto the worn cobblestone paths of the past where all roads lead to Rome.  The study of Latin provides a comprehensive introduction to the language, literature, culture and modern-day influences of ancient Rome.  Students at all levels will enhance their English verbal skills and vocabulary through learning Latin word roots, reading Latin passages, writing in Latin and listening to spoken Latin.  Students will gain appreciation and insight into ancient Greek and Roman mythology, Roman history, literature, art, philosophy and culture.  Students at all levels will have the opportunity to compete in the annual National Latin Exam.

 

Latin 1                                                                                                                 

Grade Level: 9-10

5 Credits - Full Year

In the first year of Latin, students will study the daily life, language and customs of ancient Rome. By reading about a Roman merchant and his family who lived in Pompeii before the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 CE, students will immerse themselves in the culture in the early Roman Empire.  During the course, students will incorporate knowledge about Roman civilization and its influences on modern government, art, architecture, city planning, and daily life.  Students will begin to explore mythological figures and representations of culturally significant stories in ancient and modern artworks.  This foundational study will also focus on Latin etymology of English words and the cultural influences of ancient Rome.

 

Latin 2                                                                                                                       

Prerequisite:  Latin I

Grade Level: 9-10

5 Credits - Full year

The second year of Latin builds upon the structure of knowledge gained in Latin 1.  Students will expand their knowledge of the Latin language by studying the provinces of the Roman Empire and learning specifically about a governor and his family who lived in the Roman province of Britain.  Emphasis will be placed on continuing the study of the Latin language and culturally significant figures of Roman and Greek mythology, history, art and daily life.

 

Latin 3 Honors                                                                                                   

Prerequisite: Latin 2
Grade Level: 11-12

5 Credits Per Full Year

In the third year of Latin study, the focus on the language becomes more intricate and advanced.  This honor level course will prepare students to read, write and present in advanced Latin as well as to interpret Latin passages by Roman authors using the works of Cicero, Catullus and Martial. Latin 3 Honors students will further explore the nuances of Roman philosophy, mythology, astrology, medicine, architecture, military life and government in the ancient city of Rome under the rule of the Emperor Domitian. Students will build upon their knowledge of the ancient world in order to perform higher-level tasks in the Latin language for greater fluency.  Emphasis will be placed on the philosophy, style of each author, poetic devices and prose composition as well as the purpose and aim of each work in history.

 

 

AP Latin                                                                                                         

Prerequisite: Latin 3

Grade Level: 11-12

5 Credits Per Full Year

The AP Latin course focuses on the in-depth study of selections from two of the greatest works in Latin literature: Vergil's Aeneid and Caesar's Gallic War. The course requires students to prepare and translate the readings and place these texts in a meaningful context, which helps develop critical, historical, and literary sensitivities. Throughout the course, students consider themes in the context of ancient literature and bring these works to life through classroom discussions, debates, and presentations. Additional English readings from both of these works help place the Latin readings in a significant context.  Students are expected to register for and to take the College Board AP Latin Exam at the end of the year.

 

 

French 1                                                                                                                 

Grade Level: 9-12
5 Credits - Full Year

The basic structure and vocabulary of the language are introduced and practiced through the use of film, oral practice and tapes, dialogues, narratives, dictations, conversation and writing. Students will begin to explore the culture of France and the French-speaking world.

 

French 2                                                                                                         

Prerequisite: French 1
Grade Level: 9-12
5 Credits - Full Year

French 2 continues the exploration of French structure and vocabulary with the many of the same aural-oral methods used in French I. Listening and speaking French are taught using tapes and conversations. Reading and writing are taught in a guided way through the textbook.

 

French 3                                                                                                         

Prerequisite: French 2

Grade Level: 10-12

5 Credits - Full Year

French 3 class time is divided about equally between continuing the study of the French language and applying it by reading, writing, speaking, listening, and other activities using the target language. Special cultural focus will be on the study of 19th and 20th Century French Art.

 

French 3 Honors                                                                                                    

Prerequisite:  French 2

Grade level: 10 – 12

5 Credits – full year

French 3 Honors is an accelerated study of the French language and culture.  This course is designed for the level 3 student who not only has an interest in French, but also has already demonstrated previous high-level achievement in French 2.  It is expected that students who enroll in this course will be well organized, capable of abstract reasoning, highly motivated, and recommended by their level 2 teacher.

 

French 4 Honors                                                                  

Prerequisite: French 3 or French 3 Honors

5 Credits - Full Year

A thematic unit approach will include varied activities. Short reading selections pro vide an introduction to topics, while classroom discussion and oral presentations allow for expansion. A study of advanced grammatical structures will be a major component of the class.  During the second semester, students will continue to expand their reading abilities through an unabridged novel and play as well as through short stories. Films and tapes will provide opportunities for further listening comprehension.

 

 

French 4                                                                                

Prerequisite:  French 3 or French 3 Honors

5 Credits – Full Year

French 4 has two objectives – an examination of the major grammatical structures of the language and an introduction to the analysis of literary texts.  Previously studied grammatical topics will be reviewed and new structure will be introduced and practiced.  The student will be expected to demonstrate his mastery of this material in both the oral and written form.  Short stories and excerpts of novels will be read, discussed, and analyzed in French.  Films and tapes will provide opportunities for further listening comprehension.


 

French 5                                                                                

Prerequisite:  French 4 or French 4 Honors

5 credits – Full Year

French 5 would allow students who have completed French 4, to continue their studies of the language without having to choose AP French 5.

 

French 5 class objectives will emphasize oral communication with speaking activities about contemporary issues and current news.  Informal readings will be selected from authentic material gathered from French language newspapers.  Formal reading material will be chosen from a selection of short stories and poems written by French authors.  A grammar review will be completed as a functional component of communicative language learning process.

                                                                                                                                                           

Advanced Placement French 5                                                                             

Prerequisite: French 4

5 Credits - Full Year

The first semester emphasis is on a review of the mechanics of the French language with focus on the development of a natural, flowing style in French writing and speaking. Individualized instruction will be employed in working with each student to help overcome his/her difficulties with grammar, vocabulary, phonetics and style. Reading of unabridged works will begin.

 

During the second semester, students will have the opportunity to broaden their knowledge of French literature through readings of such authors as Camus, Merimee, and Voltaire. Through these readings, students will study the techniques and biographical data reflected in the literary output of these major literary figures. Films and tapes will be used to broaden students’ abilities to comprehend the spoken word.   Students are expected to register for and to take the College Board AP French Exam at the end of the year.

 

 

Spanish 1                                                                                                              

Grade Level: 9-12
5 Credits - Full Year

The basic structure and vocabulary of the language are introduced and practiced through the use of videos, oral practice with audiocassettes, dialogues, narratives, dictations, conversation and writing.

 

Spanish 2                                                                                                              

Prerequisite: Spanish 1

Grade Level: 9-12

5 Credits - Full Year

Basic work begun in the first year is reviewed and expanded. The student continues to expand his repertoire of grammatical structures and idioms. A solid grasp of the basic structures of the language is acquired through frequent practice with audiocassettes, conversation, narratives, writing, and videos.

 

Spanish Conversation & Culture 1                                                                   

Grade Level:  9 – 11

5 Credits – Full Year

The basic structure and vocabulary of the language are introduced through the use of videos, oral practice with audiocassettes, dialogues and conversation.  The emphasis will be the practical use of language for day to day life. 

 

Spanish Conversation & Culture 2                           

Prerequisite:  Spanish Conversation & Culture I

Grade Level:  10 – 12

5 Credits – Full Year

Basic work began in the first year is reviewed.  The culture of the peninsular and Latino population will be studied through video, music, dance, and student research.

 

Spanish 3                                                                                                               

Prerequisite: Spanish 2

Grade Level: 10-12

5 Credits - Full Year

This course combines speaking, listening comprehension, and writing with special emphasis placed on composition skills. It incorporates new vocabulary and grammatical structures related to the previously learned Spanish I and 2. Spanish and Latin American Culture are discussed through the use of textbook narrative, authentic films and videocassettes.

 

Spanish 3 Honors                                                                                                

Prerequisite:  Spanish 2

Grade level:  10 – 12

5 credits – Full year

Spanish 3 Honors is an accelerated study of the Spanish language and culture.  This course is designed for the level 3 student who not only has an interest in Spanish, but also has already demonstrated previous high-level achievement in Spanish 2.  It is expected that students who enroll in this course will be well organized, capable of abstract reasoning, highly motivated, and recommended by their level 2 teacher.

 

Spanish 4 Honors                                                            

Prerequisite: Spanish 3 or Spanish 3 Honors

5 Credits - Full Year

Spanish 4 has two objectives - an examination of the major grammatical structures of the language and an introduction to the analysis of literary texts. Previously studied grammatical topics will be reviewed and new structures will be introduced and practiced. The student will be expected to demonstrate his mastery of this material in both the oral and written Spanish produced in and out of class. Short stories by contemporary peninsular and Latino authors will be read, discussed, and analyzed in Spanish.

 

Spanish 4                                                                                         

Prerequisite:  Spanish 3 or 3 Honors

5 Credits – Full year

Spanish 4 is designed to examine the major grammatical structure of Spanish and to introduce analysis of literary texts.  A study of advanced grammatical structure will be a major component of the class.  Literary selections will include short stories, excerpts of novels, and poetry from several Latin American and Spanish authors.  Films and music will provide opportunities for further listening comprehension.

 

 

Spanish 5                                                                          

Prerequisite:  Spanish 4 or Spanish 4 Honors                                                                                                                            
5 credits – Full Year

Spanish 5 would allow students who have completed Spanish 4, to continue their studies of the language without having to choose AP Spanish 5.

Spanish 5 class objectives will emphasize oral communication with speaking activities about contemporary issues and current news.  Informal readings will be selected from authentic material gathered from Spanish language newspapers.  Formal reading material will be chosen from a selection of short stories and poems written by Spanish and Latin American authors.  A grammar review will be completed as a functional component of communicative language learning process.

 

Advanced Placement Spanish 5                                                                        

Prerequisite: Spanish 4

5 Credits - Full Year

This course is designed to develop student proficiency in all four-language skills so as to meet the challenge of the Advanced Placement Examination. Contemporary texts - essays. articles, short stories. novels, poetry and plays - will be read, analyzed and discussed in Spanish. Much of the reading consists of the works of Lorca, Garcia Marquez, and Borges. Students will enhance their conversational and composition skills by composing oral presentations and written themes on both literary and nonliterary topics. Listening proficiency will be developed via tapes, films and video. This course provides a valuable preparation for those students who wish to continue study in Spanish at the university level.  Students are expected to register for and to take the College Board AP Spanish Exam at the end of the year.

 


VOCATIONAL COURSES (VO-TEC 1/2 DAY)                                                        

Grade Level: 10-12

SHARED-TIME PROGRAMS - AFTERNOON SESSION                                                           

20 Credits

Morris County School of Technology offers twenty-two career programs. Students spend a half-day (PM) at the Vo-Tech School and the other half at MLHS where they complete local academic course work and may take advantage of social and athletic activities. Students may earn a total of 20 credits per year (including math and science credits). The vocational school has also developed and continued to expand the 2 + 2 Tech Prep Program.

 

Morris County School of Technology

 

Animal Technology                                                     Culinary Arts 1 & 2

Auto Body/Collision Repair                                         Diesel Technology

Automotive Service Technician 1 & 2                         Digital Design & Advertising

Building Construction                                                 Electrical Trades

Building/Grounds/Maintenance Services                   Food Services

Business Information Tech. Systems                         Networking & Information Technology

Carpentry                                                                   Plumbing

Child Related Careers                                               Retail & Supermarket Careers

Computer Drafting & Graphic Studio                         Welding Technology

Cosmetology 1 & 2                                                             

 


AUDITING

No credits or grades are given for an audited class. A course may be audited for the purpose of strengthening a particular area of study or for enrichment. It is not an option to be used in order to avoid a course being used in a student’s cumulative G.P.A. This option must be initiated and approved at the beginning of the school year or the semester prior to the start of the course. An application stating the student’s goals and approval of the teacher and administrators must be submitted for final approval.

 

GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION AND PROCEDURES

 

Home Instruction

Students become eligible when the school physician determines a diagnosis and prognosis. The student’s doctor shall provide the school district with a required written statement, which must include the reason why the student is absent from school (mononucleosis, surgery, etc.) as well as the projected length of absence. Instruction is provided for students when the doctor indicates that the absence will be two weeks or more in duration. Instruction can begin only after the school physician has established eligibility. This information should be brought to the Guidance Department where home instruction application and eligibility reports will be filled out and checked by the nurse. Then the forms and note will be sent to the Child Study Team in order for the home instruction arrangements to be processed.

 

The procedure is slightly different when students are referred to a substance abuse rehabilitation facility. That facility should send the doctor’s statement directly to the Coordinator of Special Education.

 

Incompletes

An incomplete grade (“IC”) must be made up within two weeks after the close of the marking period. In case of extended illness, additional time may be granted to a student for make-up work. Teachers shall judge each case on its individual merits. Final resolutions of student incomplete and grade change forms should be coordinated through the Director of Guidance.

 

Make-Up Work

When a student has been absent from school, all missed work should be made up. It is the student’s responsibility to consult with his/her teachers about makeup assignments. It is the responsibility of both the student and the teacher to arrange times for make-up work. In the event that a student misses a test during an excused absence, it is the student’s responsibility to contact the teacher immediately upon his or her return to school in order to arrange for a make-up test. Teachers are expected to exercise good judgment in making such arrangements and to consult with the pupil’s other teachers when a lengthy illness has created a large amount of make-up work to be done in a short period of time.

 

Withdrawal from a course

1.   Dropping a course/transfer to a like course:

      No course may be dropped nor a like course added after the first ten days of the second marking period (in a full-year course). Example: English (Honors) - English (Regular) or after 25 days in a Semester Course.

 

      Once a grade has been placed on the report card, that grade will remain. (i.e. If a student changes from one course to another, for example from Honors English to Regular English, the grade received in Honors English will remain and will be included with the grades received in the Regular English course; however, no weighted grade point value will be given if the weighted course is dropped and a regular course is added).

 

2.   Dropping a course/no like course is added:

If exceptionally extraordinary circumstances arise such that dropping a course after the first ten days of the second marking period in a full year course is warranted and no like course is added, that course and the grade earned will remain on the report card with the following designation: Example: AP Computer Science - WF (Withdraw Failing) or WP (Withdraw Passing), e.g., AP Computer Science Q1 – D-; Q2 – WP; FG  - WP.

 

3.  It should be noted that a senior who withdraws from a course is placed in a unique position.  If a transcript for a senior has already been sent to a college or university such that the dropped course appeared on the official transcript as a course in progress, it will be necessary for the college or university to be informed of the dropped course.  The integrity of official transcripts mandates such action.  The Director of Guidance or the counselor will inform the college or university of this change in the student’s program.

 

 

Mountain Lakes High School Library

 

The high school library collection includes over 20,000 books and materials. Macintosh and IBM platform workstations are available for word processing, multimedia production and database searching. A scanner is available as well as a variety of CD ROM products. A network of computers offers database searching of periodical indexes, full text resources and guidance systems offering career and college information. Access to the Internet is available to students who have a network responsibility contract on file with the librarian. In addition the library is a member of the Highlands Regional Library Cooperative: New Jersey Library Network Region I giving students access to materials from over 100 academic, public and school libraries.

 

 

Lake Drive Program for Secondary Deaf & Hard of Hearing Students

at Mountain Lakes High School

 

The Lake Drive Program for Secondary Deaf & Hard of Hearing Students at Mountain Lakes High School offers a curriculum designed to foster academic and social skills which are prerequisite to a successful post secondary education in an academic or vocational /technical program. Housed at Mountain Lakes High School, the program offers a wide variety of services for deaf/hard of hearing students in grades nine through twelve.  An individual educational plan is devised in conjunction with each student’s sending district. Both mainstream and self-contained classes are available in all academic areas. Self-contained classes are taught using a total communication approach, by trained teachers of the deaf/hard of hearing.

 

Interpreters and assistive listening devices are available for mainstreamed classes, extra curricular activities, school assembly programs and special evening programs.

 

 

LEARNING IN THE COMMUNITY (LINC)

 

The New Jersey State Board of Education has encouraged schools to instill in young people a sense of community purpose and service to society.  To this end, Learning in the Community (LINC) is a program that integrates into the curriculum both career development and service learning through actual experience.  As its acronym implies, Learning in the Community links students, faculty and community together in a program that highlights service, experience and reflection.  Interested students are placed in apprentice and internship programs for career exploration and/or volunteer experiences for service learning.  Opportunities include but are not limited to the areas of computer technology, graphic arts, market research, construction, public works and television production.  Through LINC students can earn a maximum of 5 credits per year upon successful completion of the program, which requires a diary of their experiences during their placement, a weekly conference, a final reflection and a presentation to a class in MLHS.  The course is available to all students.

 

 

VOLUNTEER WORK FOR ACADEMIC CREDIT

 

Mountain Lakes High School also supports volunteer work for academic credit.  Working through recognized social agencies, students are encouraged to work in the areas of conservation, health services, tutorial service, preschool programs, library service and as participants in Serve America or Reach America programs.

 

Properly devised and executed, such programs can involve students in adult problems and thus provide valuable learning experiences in the real world, stimulate self-discipline, create better understanding of social problems, and instill pride in American citizenship.

 

Academic credit will be granted on the basis of the type and quality of the service rendered by the student, as well as the time spent as a volunteer.  A maximum of 5 credits per year may be earned through this program (24 hours of actual volunteer work = 1 credit).


Student Assistance Program

 

The Student Assistance Program is a confidential in-school counseling and personal development program.  Students may use the program for support and assistance with a broad range of difficulties including emotional, social, family, substance abuse and/or any other life situations that negatively impact on their well being.  The student assistance coordinator is responsible for coordinating program activities and student counseling services.

 

The coordinator works very closely with the teachers and the Intervention and Referral Services Team.  Together they provide services to enhance student success and serve as mentors, role models, and advocates for the students.

 

Desire for Non-Release of Information

 

According to the “No Child Left Behind Act,” each local educational agency will provide armed forces recruiters access to names, addresses and telephone numbers of all secondary school students within the district.  Should a parent not wish for this information to be released, written request must be provided.

 

 

 

 

CLOSE